FOX 32 takes you back to the 1945 World Series

We all know the wait for the Cubs to return to the World Series has been long and excruciating, and things have changed a lot since the last time the Cubs made it this far.

FOX 32 NEWS - We all know the wait for the Cubs to return to the World Series has been long and excruciating, and things have changed a lot since the last time the Cubs made it this far.

The Cubs are back in the World Series for the first time since 1945, and while there are a lot of people who were around back then, few have a better recollection of what life was actually like in 1945 than 97-year-old Chicago native Jim Schlegal. He remembers it well. He was just back from bravely serving our country in World War Two.

"I rode down there on a streetcar, never paid a dime to get to the ballpark,” Schlegal said.

That’s right gen-exers: In 1945, Chicagoans got around on what was known then as the "surface lines.”

But what about that Cubs team? The one that went down in defeat to the Detroit Tigers? Yeah, Schlegal remembers them, too.

"Phil Cavaretta was on first, Don Johnson was on second, Len Murello was short, Stan Hack was at third,” Schlegal said.

If you take a good look at the 1945 team, there was not a single black player. Jackie Robinson wouldn't break the color barrier for another two years.

This year, the man leading off for the Cubs has been Dexter Fowler. Fowler himself tweeted out his surprise after learning about his place in Cubs history.

Ticket prices at Wrigley this year have made national headlines, averaging 3-thousand dollars a pop.

Back in 1945, you could see the World Series in person for just a $1.20.

Hey millennials, did you know that back in 1945 people had to physically mail their bills and letters? The cost of a postage stamp? Three cents. The forever stamp didn't even exist.

In 1945, Schlegal lived on the Northwest Side in a house going for about ten grand. Today, they're selling for just under 200 thousand dollars.

As for how WFLD covered the World Series back in 1945, we didn't. We didn't go on the air as a television station until January of 1966.

A quick foot note: Schlegal bet a friend five dollars that the Cubs would win the World Series against the Tigers. Adjusting for inflation, that's $66 today.

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