Chicago protests continue: 'Shoot me 16 times officer, I dare you'

It was a busy, loud, and at some points, a bit contentious night of marching, chanting and protesting in Chicago. Demonstrators beat the drum of dissatisfaction about what happened to Laquan McDonald and how the investigation was handled.

CHICAGO (FOX 32 News) - It was a busy, loud, and at some points, a bit contentious night of marching, chanting and protesting in Chicago. Demonstrators beat the drum of dissatisfaction about what happened to Laquan McDonald and how the investigation was handled.

As protesters headed up State Street, a dozen protesters chanted about what many find to be the most troubling aspect of the shooting of Laquan McDonald: Why Officer Jason Van Dyke had to shoot him 16 times after he was already on the ground.

“If it was not for the dash cam video, we wouldn't even be here. Because this entire execution would be swept under the rug,” said Tio Hardiman of Violence Interupters.

Protesters sometimes taunted officers.

“Shoot me sixteen times, shoot me sixteen times officer, do it, I dare you,” a protester said.

One protester repeatedly taunted officer’s right to their face, trying to provoke a reaction. However, police kept their calm.

“Justice for Laquan, which side are you on, justice for Laquan, which side are you on,” protesters chanted.

Protesters shut down traffic at several intersections during the heart of rush hour. But police officers with bikes blocked roads heading east to keep the demonstrators from leaving Michigan Avenue and getting onto Lake Shore Drive.

Frustrated motorists voiced their displeasure at the inconvenience by honking their horns, while other supported the demonstrators right to do what they were doing.

“I'm trying to get home, trying to pick up my wife and go home. I think they're doing okay, just they're not causing any violence or nothing,” trapped motorist Alfredo Yepz said.

As demonstrators made their way up the Mag Mile, they counted out the 16 shots that took Laquan McDonald's life. And while they were at times loud, there was no violence.

“We have to protest peacefully, that's the only way. It worked for Dr. King, It worked for Rev. Jackson, it's gonna work in Chicago,” a protester said.

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