CFD investigates after shooting victim left under sheet while still alive

There’s outrage from relatives of a Chicago teenager who died after paramedics put a white sheet over him at a crime scene, not realizing he was still alive.

The teenager's family says the Chicago Fire Department dropped the ball. Maybe, just maybe, their loved one could still be alive if he was rushed to the hospital in time.

The fire department says what happened was unacceptable.

“I need everyone to do their job because I’m going to do my job as a father and find out what happened,” said father Eric Carey.

17-year-old Erin Carey was Eric Carey's youngest child -- an Evanston Township High School graduate, football player and Boys and Girls Club mentor.

Erin was shot in the head early Monday morning -- one of six people wounded during a party near 13th and South Loomis. His family and their attorney say paramedics left him for dead, covered him with a sheet while he was still breathing.

“Their conduct was not just negligent, not just reckless but definitely disgraceful,” said attorney Nenye Uche.

It wasn't until bystanders pointed out he was moving that then paramedics took him to the hospital --- 50 minutes after the shooting.

“My son lived what? 24 hours more than that? After he got to the hospital, but the doctor said there was a chance,” Eric Carey said.

A Chicago Fire Department spokesperson says something went wrong and it's unacceptable, and the department has launched a formal investigation, interviewing the paramedics involved.

Chicago police say a "Mac 10" was found close to Erin’s body, but it's unclear who was carrying the weapon.

But his family insists he had no access to weapons.

“Here's my question back to that? Did my son shoot his own self in the head?” Eric Carey said.

The Carey family is not taking legal action, but did not rule it out. Their attorney is asking Chicago police and fire to preserve all evidence in this case.

Up Next:


  • Popular

  • Recent

More Stories You May Be Interested In - includes Advertiser Stories