Jury in case of Minnesota police officer who killed black motorist Philando Castile says: Not guilty

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) -- A Minnesota police officer was acquitted of manslaughter Friday in the fatal shooting of Philando Castile, a black motorist whose girlfriend streamed the aftermath live on Facebook.

Jeronimo Yanez was also cleared of two lesser charges in the July traffic stop in a St. Paul suburb, drawing an emotional reaction from Castile family members who stormed out of the courtroom. 

"The fact in this matter is that my son was murdered, and I'll continue to say murdered, because where in this planet (can you) tell the truth, and you be honest, and you still be murdered by the police of Minnesota," his mother, Valerie Castile said, referring to the fact that her son was shot seconds after he volunteered to the officer, "Sir, I have to tell you, I do have a firearm on me." 

"He didn't deserve to die the way he did," Philando Castile's sister, Allysza, said, through tears. "I will never have faith in the system."

Supporters of the family planned a 7 p.m. CDT rally at the Capitol. Meanwhile, the city of St. Anthony swiftly announced plans to dismiss Yanez, saying it had concluded "the public will be best served" if he left the department. 

Jurors deliberated for about 29 hours over five days before reaching the verdict in the death of Castile, who had a permit for the weapon. Prosecutors argued that Yanez had overreacted and that Castile, a school cafeteria worker, was not a threat.

Yanez, who is Latino, testified that Castile was pulling his gun out of his pocket despite his commands not to do so. The defense also argued Castile was high on marijuana and said that affected his actions.

Yanez stared ahead with no reaction as the verdict was read. Afterward, one of his attorneys, Tom Kelly, said the defense was "satisfied."

"We were confident in our client. We felt all along his conduct was justified. However that doesn't take away from the tragedy of the event," Kelly said.

Prosecutors declined to comment.

Castile's shooting was among a string of killings of blacks by police around the U.S., including two other cases on trial this week in Ohio and Wisconsin. The livestreaming of its aftermath by Castile's girlfriend, Diamond Reynolds, attracted even more attention. The public outcry included protests in Minnesota that shut down highways and surrounded the governor's mansion. Castile's family claimed he was profiled because of his race, and the shooting renewed concerns about how police officers interact with minorities. 

In reaction to the verdict, Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton offered his condolences to the Castile family, calling his death "a terrible tragedy" in a statement that made no mention of Yanez. Dayton drew criticism in the days after the shooting for suggesting that Castile might not have been shot if he was white. 

The evidence included squad car video, but its wide view didn't capture exactly what happened inside the car -- leaving jurors to essentially decide whether they believed Yanez when he said Castile had his hand on the gun. Prosecutors questioned whether Yanez had even seen it, and witnesses testified that it was in a pocket of Castile's shorts when paramedics pulled him from the car.

Juror Dennis Ploussard said the jury was split 10-2 early this week in favor of acquittal. They spent a lot of time dissecting the "culpable negligence" requirement for conviction, and the last two holdouts eventually agreed Friday on acquittal. He declined to say whether he thought Yanez acted appropriately, but said the jury sympathizes with the Castile family. 

"We struggled with it. I struggled with it. It was very, very hard," Ploussard said, adding that he thought the jury delivered the right verdict. 

He would not identify the two early holdouts, but said they were not the jury's only two black members. The rest of the jurors were white. None was Latino.

Yanez was charged with second-degree manslaughter, punishable by up to 10 years in prison, though sentencing guidelines suggested around four years would have been more likely. The lesser counts related to endangering Castile's girlfriend and her then-4-year-old daughter for firing his gun into the car near them.

Yanez testified that he stopped Castile in the St. Paul suburb of Falcon Heights because he thought he looked like one of two men who had robbed a nearby convenience store a few days earlier. Castile's car had a faulty brake light, giving the 29-year-old officer reason to pull him over, several experts testified.

The squad-car video shows Yanez approaching Castile's car and asking for a driver's license and proof of insurance. Castile appears to give something to Yanez through the driver's side window. Castile then informs the officer he's carrying a weapon, but before he finishes his sentence, Yanez has his hand on his own gun and is pulling it out of the holster. There is shouting, and Yanez screams, "Don't pull it out!" before he fires seven shots into the car, five of which hit Castile. Prosecutors say Castile's last words were: "I wasn't reaching for it."

After shooting Castile, Yanez is heard on the squad-car video telling a supervisor that he didn't know where Castile's gun was, then that he told Castile to get his hand off it. Yanez testified that he meant that he didn't see the gun at first, then saw it in Castile's "right thigh area." He said Castile ignored his commands to stop pulling it out of his pocket. Yanez's voice choked with emotion as he talked of being "scared to death" and thinking of his wife and baby daughter in the split-second before he fired.

Prosecutors argued that Yanez could have taken lesser steps, such as asking to see Castile's hands or asking where the gun was. 

Reynolds testified that she began recording the shooting's aftermath because she feared for her life and wanted to make sure the truth was known. Defense attorneys pointed to inconsistencies in several of her statements. 

. (AP) -- The jury weighing the case of a Minnesota police officer who shot and killed a black motorist  told the judge they had reached a verdict of not guilty after asking to have the officer's entire testimony re-read to them.

It was the fifth day of deliberations in Officer Jeronimo Yanez's manslaughter trial in the death of Philando Castile. Castile, a 32-year-old school cafeteria worker, was shot during a traffic stop July 6 in a St. Paul suburb, just seconds after he informed Yanez he was carrying a gun. Castile had a permit.
 
Yanez, who is Latino, testified that Castile disregarded his commands not to pull out the gun and that he feared for his life. Prosecutors insist Yanez never saw the gun and say he overreacted to a non-threat.
 
The trial included squad-car video of the traffic stop, but the wide view did not show exactly what took place inside Castile's car, leaving jurors largely in the position of whether to believe the officer's testimony. A key part of the prosecution case was statements Yanez made that seemed to suggest he didn't know where the gun was.
 
The first sign of the jury's struggle came Wednesday, when Leary summoned the apparently deadlocked jury to court, reminded the panel of its duty to try to reach a verdict and sent the jurors back to work.
 
While Leary didn't spell out the reasons for denying their request Friday to review Yanez's testimony, prominent Minnesota defense attorneys noted the jury's instructions when the trial began to listen carefully, take notes and rely on their memories. 
 
If testimony from one figure is re-read, it's almost like they're testifying again, said Marsh Halberg, a defense attorney not connected to the case.
 
"It puts undue weight and influence on one part of the case," he said.
 
The failure to reach a quick verdict reflects the infrequent convictions of police officers.
 
Philip Stinson, a criminologist at Ohio's Bowling Green State University who tracks fatal police shootings, found that almost 40 percent of the 82 officers nationwide charged with murder or manslaughter since 2005 were not convicted. That included several recent cases that ended in mistrials or acquittals when officers testified they feared for their lives, Stinson said.
 
Yanez faces up to 10 years in prison if convicted on the second-degree manslaughter charge, though sentencing guidelines suggest around four years is more likely. He also faces two lesser counts of endangering Reynolds and her daughter for firing his gun into the car near them.
 
Conviction on the manslaughter charge requires the jury to find Yanez guilty of "culpable negligence," which the judge described in jury instructions as gross negligence with an element of recklessness.
 
The 12-member jury includes two black members. The rest are white. None is Latino. 
 
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